#HYHRD: spreadsheets for 2/6 q*.!.*p

I have combined all spreadsheets into one workbook (PandAtradelogs.xlsx) to make them easier for me to get the info I need. The spreadsheets that I use mainly in my weekly posts are the Score spreadsheet, Equal Weight (Investment amounts) spreadsheet, the Expected dividend (stock holdings) spreadsheets (parts 1, 1a, 2, 3, & 4), the actual yield (‘dividend per invested dollar’) spreadsheet, the dates spreadsheet, and the watch list (screening) spreadsheet. They are all now found in the PandAtradelogs workbook. This and the next few posts will attempt to show how I use these sheets.

The spreadsheet for each individual account, along with the monthly balances and yearly dividends are also found in the PandAtradelogs workbook.

This post will examine the screening spreadsheets and associated scoring, and the dates spreadsheet for all positions held in the accounts (i.e.; positions not held will not appear on the dates spreadsheet).

Here’s the Screening spreadsheet;

Google Drive has the most recent workbooks accessible, in my public files area.

Here’s the newest dividend stock watch list;

watchlist

You might notice the colors in the % yield, % return, and total columns have changed. In the % yield column, anything greater than or equal to 5% is green, or if it’s less than 5% it’s yellow, or if it’s less than 0% it’s red. In the % return column, anything greater than or equal to 20% is green, or if it’s less than 20% it’s yellow, or if it’s less than 0% it’s red. In the total column, anything greater than or equal to 25% is green, or if it’s less than 25% it’s yellow, or if it’s less than 5% it’s red. (Color coding helps in making the decision to buy (green), hold (yellow), or sell (red) much easier to see at a glance.) The color code key is in the lower right corner.

According to this spreadsheet (updated each weekend);

Based solely on the scoring procedure used on this Screening Spreadsheet, I might look into buying any symbols that are “in the green”, and may initiate a position at some point in the future.

The watchlist sheet is interesting because it tells me how long a symbol has held a particular position. It shows symbols that move a lot or a little, and how far, over time. For this reason alone, EDUC looks interesting as it has occupied the top position for 20 weeks, but is relatively new to this list compared to some of the others. It also does not pay a qualified dividend.

This spreadsheet is data that is taken from the watchlist, but contains only stock paying qualified dividends;

qualified

The qualified sheet is interesting because it also tells me how long a symbol has held a particular position. It also shows symbols that move a lot or a little, and how far, over time. For this reason alone, CBNJ looks interesting as it has occupied the top 2 positions for 18 weeks, but is relatively new to this list compared to the others. It should be noted that the last (14th) position has no new entries since I ‘only’ have enough symbols left to partially fill the 13th postion, having added some symbols to my portfolio.

Now let’s look at the SCORE spreadsheet to check out the best performers amongst my current holdings.

score

You might notice the colors in the % yield, % return, and total columns have changed. In the % yield column, anything greater than or equal to 5% is green, or if it’s less than 5% it’s yellow, or if it’s less than 0% it’s red. In the % return column, anything greater than or equal to 20% is green, or if it’s less than 20% it’s yellow, or if it’s less than 0% it’s red. In the total column, anything greater than or equal to 25% is green, or if it’s less than 25% it’s yellow, or if it’s less than 5% it’s red. (Color coding helps in making the decision to buy (green), hold (yellow), or sell (red) much easier to see at a glance.) The color code key is in the lower right corner.

The score sheet shows our portfolio holdings and is interesting because it also tells me how long a symbol has held a particular position. It also shows symbols that move a lot or a little, and how far, over time. For this reason alone, GSB looks interesting as it has occupied one of the top positions for 13 weeks, but is relatively new to this list compared to the others.

RMDs are something that will have to be looked at in a few years, but for now they do not pose a problem. They will show up on the balances worksheet to show withdrawals for the coming year in the tradelogs workbook beginning in 2024.

I may remove or replace symbols from the spreadsheet(s) if they do not pass screening and/or perform poorly, and as long as no shares are held in the portfolio.

I am now looking into Preferred Securities. I’ll need to do more DD on that before I start to invest, and/or post my opinions about them.

Here’s a look at the dates spreadsheet, showing the ex-dividend and pay dates as well as can best be determined whether a stock pays a qualified dividend or not. I sometimes use info like this to time purchases after a stock goes ex-dividend, due to the anticipated drop in stock price, or to make sure I own a stock before the ex-dividend date to ensure I am entitled to the dividend. I mainly use it to keep track of the dates and amounts, and whether a stock pays a qualified dividend or not. YMMV!

dates

But, as always, “Don’t be hasty” as Treebeard would say. 😉

About PandA Trader

I am, I think... "Disobedience, in the eyes of anyone who has read history, is man's original virtue. It is through disobedience and rebellion that progress has been made." -- Oscar Wilde
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